Our Favorite Things Volume 17

by Leslie McDonald

Our Favorite Things Volume 17Living Bridges, Literally

The tiny village of Mawsynram in Meghalaya puts Colorado’s frequent afternoon rainstorms to shame. Wearing “the wettest place on earth” badge with honor, the locals train the roots of rubber trees to grow into resilient natural bridges and ladders that last for centuries, where man-made wooden structures would deteriorate within a few years. Talk about 100% living architecture!

An article in The Atlantic tells the story of this amazing place with 18 gorgeous photos.

 

Our Favorite Things Volume 17
Make Room for the Pallone

Nicole’s eyes lit up when she sat her toosh on the Pallone chair by Leolux. This quirky, squatty, finely-crafted leather armchair is not only striking, it has a highly coveted feature not many chairs have: you can comfortably sit cross-legged on it! Now that’s a chair to spend some hours in.

Leolux produces its furniture in Venlo, the city nominated as the C2C (Cradle to Cradle) capital of the Netherlands. Making consumer goods will most likely never become a neutral practice, but Leolux regards it as their duty to strive for the maximum achievable. View the Pallone here.

Our Favorite Things Volume 17Jewel-Box Bank

It’s surprising what thrills an architect, but last week David forwarded a friend’s email to everyone in the office with a snapshot of … a bank.

We have to agree, this bank deserves a second look. Merchants National Bank Building in Grinnell, Iowa was designed by the father of modern American architecture Louis H. Sullivan. David remarked to his friend. “When you think of the impermanence of banks today…both literally and architecturally…this is an expression of a solid capitalism, equal to a church.” It’s worth a quick read to learn about this fascinating National Historic Monument.

Our Favorite Things Volume 17Solar Roadways

Driving on sunshine? That’s what inventors Julie and Scott Brusaw from Sagle Idaho have in mind. Solar panels that you can drive, park and walk on – they melt snow, light pathways and lanes, provide real-time warning signs for upcoming traffic hazards, and best of all, they generate electricity. With initial funding from a $750,000 Federal Highway Administration grant and $2.2 million from an Indiegogo campaign, the Brusaw’s are well on their way to their first public installations. Check out their silly but informative video to learn about these roads of the future.

 

 

 

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